Pollen-starved bumblebees bite 'half-moons' into plants to make them bloom  Live ScienceView Full Coverage on Google News
Scientists don't yet know when or how the behavior evolved.Scientists don't yet know when or how the behavior evolved.

Pollen-starved bumblebees bite 'half-moons' into plants to make them bloom | Live Science

Bumble bees rely heavily on pollen resources for essential nutrients as they build their summer colonies. Therefore, we might expect that annual differences in the availability of these resources must simply be tolerated, but Pashalidou et al. made observations suggesting that bees may have strategies to cope with irregular seasonal flowering (see the Perspective by Chittka). When faced with a shortage of pollen, bumble bees actively damaged plant leaves in a characteristic way, and this behavior resulted in earlier flowering by as much as 30 days. Experimenters were not able to fully replicate the results with their own damage, suggesting that there is a distinct method that the bees use to stimulate earlier flowering. Science , this issue p. [881][1]; see also p. [824][2] Maintaining phenological synchrony with flowers is a key ecological challenge for pollinators that may be exacerbated by ongoing environmental change. Here, we show that bumble bee workers facing pollen scarcity damage leaves of flowerless plants and thereby accelerate flower production. Laboratory studies revealed that leaf-damaging behavior is strongly influenced by pollen availability and that bee-damaged plants flower significantly earlier than undamaged or mechanically damaged controls. Subsequent outdoor experiments showed that the intensity of damage inflicted varies with local flower availability; furthermore, workers from wild colonies of two additional bumble bee species were also observed to damage plant leaves. These findings elucidate a feature of bumble bee worker behavior that can influence the local availability of floral resources. [1]: /lookup/doi/10.1126/science.aay0496 [2]: /lookup/doi/10.1126/science.abc2451

Bumble bees damage plant leaves and accelerate flower production when pollen is scarce | Science

Scientists discover a new behaviour among bumblebees that tricks plants into flowering early.

Nature: Bumblebees' 'clever trick' fools plants into flowering - BBC News

Bumblebees nibble on flowerless plants to make them bloom early, reports a new study. This potentially helps struggling bee populations find more pollen.Bumblebees nibble on flowerless plants to make them bloom early, reports a new study. This potentially helps struggling bee populations find more pollen.

Bumblebees are hacking nature in an effort to survive — study

“Nature pic for today: White-tailed Bumblebee on an allium onion plant #nature #gardening #bees”

Frank Gardner on Twitter: "Nature pic for today: White-tailed Bumblebee on an allium onion plant #nature #gardening #bees… "

Bumblebees need pollen from flowers to survive. But increasingly, the creatures are waking up earlier in the year when flowers have not yet bloomed due to the climate crisis. Nature appears to be finding a way, though. Bumblebees need pollen from flowers to survive. But increasingly, the creatures are waking up earlier in the year when flowers have not yet bloomed due to the climate crisis. Nature appears to be finding a way, though.

Genius Bees Force Plants to Bloom by Biting Them

The climate crisis has caused Japanese cherry blossoms to bloom in October and sped the arrival of spring in much of the U.S. But it turns out that humans aren't the only animals who can trick plants into flowering early. Scientists have discovered that bumblebees can cause plants to flower ahead of schedule by biting their leaves.The climate crisis has caused Japanese cherry blossoms to bloom in October and sped the arrival of spring in much of the U.S. But it turns out that humans aren't the only animals who can trick plants into flowering early.

Bumblebees Trick Plants Into Flowering Early, Study Finds - EcoWatch

The behavior could be an evolutionary adaptation that lets bees forage more easilyThe behavior could be an evolutionary adaptation that lets bees forage more easily

Bumblebees Bite Plants to Force Them to Flower (Seriously) - Scientific American

Scientists have discovered a new technique that bumble bees use to make plants flower earlier. When faced with a shortage of pollen, bumble bees will damage plant leaves by eating them in order to make the plant flower earlier – sometimes as much as a month before it would flower naturally for tomato plants.Scientists have discovered a new technique that bumble bees use to make plants flower earlier. When faced with a shortage of pollen, bumble bees will damage plant leaves by eating them in order to

Bees using secret trick to make plants flower, leaving scientists baffled | The Independent

When pollen is in short supply, bumblebees damage plant leaves in a way that accelerates flower production, as an ETH research team headed up by Consuelo De Moraes and Mark Mescher has demonstrated.

Bumblebees speed up flowering by piercing plants

There's a secret bumblebee trick that can trigger plants to flower a month earlier than they would otherwise. Researchers in Switzerland discovered that when bumblebees chew a specific pattern into the leaves of a plant, it flowers up to 30 days early.There’s a secret bumblebee trick that can trigger plants to flower a month earlier than they would otherwise. Researchers in Switzerland discovered that when bumblebees chew a specific patter…

Bumblebees can trick plants into flowering early – BGR

In a pollen shortage, some bees nick holes in tomato leaves that accelerate flowering, and pollen production, by weeks.

Pollen-deprived bumblebees bite leaves and may speed up plant blooms | Science News

How it actually works remains a mystery, but if replicated by humans, it could be a boon for agriculture.How it actually works remains a mystery, but if replicated by humans, it could be a boon for agriculture.

Bumblebees bite plants to make them flower early, surprising scientists

A new study reveals that bumblebees contribute in more ways than imagined so far. A new study reveals that bumblebees contribute in more ways than imagined so far.

Bumblebees Can Puncture Holes in Leaves to Speed up Flower Bloom, Finds Study

Hungry bumblebees can make plants flower up to a month earlier than usual by cutting holes in their leaves, which may help them adapt to climate changeHungry bumblebees can make plants flower up to a month earlier than usual by cutting holes in their leaves, which may help them adapt to climate change

Bees force plants to flower early by cutting holes in their leaves | New Scientist

Bees may be famously hard workers but a study suggests that as they forage for food they rely not only on industry but a clever gardening technique.Researchers have found that during times when pollenBees may be famously hard workers but a study suggests that as they forage for food they rely not only on industry but a clever gardening technique.Researchers have found that during times when pollen

Bumblebees bite the leaves of flowerless plants to cause intentional damage in such a way that accelerates the production of flowers.Bumblebees bite the leaves of flowerless plants to cause intentional damage in such a way that accelerates the production of flowers.

Bees help plants produce flowers faster by nibbling on their leaves | Daily Mail Online