1. Dow Jones Falls, Nasdaq Leads Downside As Janet Yellen Warns Of Rising Interest Rates  Investor's Business Daily
  2. Treasury Secretary Yellen says rates may have to rise somewhat to keep economy from overheating  CNBC
  3. Interest rates may have to rise: Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen  Yahoo Finance
  4. Insana: Yellen is right to hint that higher rates are on the horizon  CNBC
  5. Yellen: Higher interest rates may be needed to prevent economy from 'overheating'  Yahoo Finance
  6. View Full Coverage on Google News

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Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen conceded that interest rates may have to rise to keep a lid on the burgeoning economic growth.Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen conceded that interest rates may have to rise to keep a lid on the burgeoning economic growth.

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Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen said this week that the Federal Reserve may have to raise interest rates in the future to cool off an economy moving too fast.Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen said this week that the Federal Reserve may have to raise interest rates in the future to cool off an economy moving too fast.

Yellen: Higher interest rates may be needed to prevent economy from 'overheating'

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Gold prices finish lower on Tuesday after U.S. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen suggested that interest rates may need to rise to keep the economy from...Gold prices finish lower on Tuesday after U.S. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen suggested that interest rates may need to rise to keep the economy from...

Gold prices finish lower as Yellen suggests a potential rise in U.S. interest rates - MarketWatch

Cryptocurrency markets slid amid broad risk-off moves as U.S. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen warned that interest rates might have to rise.Cryptocurrency markets slid amid broad risk-off moves as U.S. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen warned that interest rates might have to rise.

Crypto Markets, Apart From Dogecoin, Join US Stock Sell-Off as Yellen Warns on Rates - CoinDesk

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Janet Yellen later reversed herself, showing the difficult tightrope she walks in her new roleJanet Yellen later reversed herself, showing the difficult tightrope she walks in her new role

Yellen suggests Biden spending plan could lead to interest rate hikes - The Washington Post

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Comments from the Treasury Secretary at event held by The Atlantic: Here's the full quote: This comment has sent equities to the lows of the day and the US dollar sharply higher. By Adam ButtonComments from the Treasury Secretary at event held by The Atlantic: Here's the full quote: This comment has sent equities to the lows of the day and the US dollar sharply higher.

Yellen: Rates might have to rise to keep the economy from overheating

US Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen said on Tuesday that President Joe Biden is addressing long-standing problems with the US economy, as reported by RUS Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen said on Tuesday that President Joe Biden is addressing long-standing problems with the US economy, as reported by R

US Treasury Sec. Yellen: Uncollected taxes amount to $7 trillion over a decade

Comments from US treasury secretary sends tremors through already jittery financial marketsComments from US treasury secretary sends tremors through already jittery financial markets

Fear of rising interest rates sends shares tumbling in both US and Europe | Stock markets | The Guardian

Stocks end mixed with shares of tech giants remaining under pressure as investors rotate into higher-yielding value stocks.

Stocks End Mixed as Tech Tumbles and Yellen Raises Rate Fears

The remarks are significant because they come from Biden’s top economic counselor and are a key break from what officials have been saying on the Federal Reserve, the institution in charge with setting short-term interest rates that Yellen formerly led before President Donald Trump replaced her with Chairman Jerome Powell. The Fed’s Powell just last week swatted away worries about inflation and overheating.

Attention Borrowers, Savers: Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen Says Interest Rates May Need To Rise | Bankrate

Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen said Tuesday that higher interest rates may be needed in order to stave off runaway economic growth in the U.S.Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen said Tuesday that higher interest rates may be needed in order to stave off runaway economic growth in the U.S.

Yellen says interest rates may need to rise to stop economy from overheating | Fox Business

Senior Technical Analyst Jim Wyckoff prepares investors with an overview of how the markets opened and closed. What moved metal prices? How do the technicals look? By looking at important developments Senior Technical Analyst Jim Wyckoff prepares investors with an overview of how the markets opened and closed. What moved metal prices? How do the technicals look? By looking at important developments

Gold, silver blindsided by hawkish Yellen comments | Kitco News

Tech stocks are taking a beating on Tuesday and there's a couple of reasons worth noting detailed in our market update for today.Tech stocks are taking a beating on Tuesday and there's a couple of reasons worth noting detailed in our market update for today.

Market Update: Why Are Tech Stocks Down Today? | InvestorPlace

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The dollar hit a two-week high on Tuesday, as risk appetite faded amid a sell-off in stocks, with U.S. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen's comments saying interest rates may need to rise to prevent the American economy from overheating also supporting the greenback.The dollar hit a two-week high on Tuesday, as risk appetite faded amid a sell-off in stocks, with U.S. Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen's comments saying interest rates may need to rise to prevent the American economy from overheating also supporting the greenback.

Dollar rallies as risk appetite dims, after Yellen's comments on rates | Reuters

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News, analysis and comment from the Financial Times, the worldʼs leading global business publication

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"It may be that interest rates will have to rise somewhat to make sure that our economy doesn't overheat, even though the additional spending is relatively small relative to the size of the economy," she said in taped remarks to a virtual event. "It may be that interest rates will have to rise somewhat to make sure that our economy doesn't overheat, even though the additional spending is relatively small relative to the size of the economy," she said in taped remarks to a virtual event.

Interest rates may need to rise modestly, says Janet Yellen - The Economic Times

The comments contrast with the Federal Reserve's outlook, which sees rates near zero through 2023 amid "transitory" bouts of stronger inflation.The comments contrast with the Federal Reserve's outlook, which sees rates near zero through 2023 amid "transitory" bouts of stronger inflation.

Sec. Yellen Says Higher Rates Might Be Needed to Prevent Overheating

Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen ruffled financial markets Tuesday with a comment economists regarded as self evident -- that interest rates will likely rise as government spending ramps up and the economy responds with faster growth.

Yellen ruffles markets on prospect for higher rates - BNN Bloomberg

US treasury secretary says rates may have to rise somewhat to keep economy from overheatingUS treasury secretary says rates may have to rise somewhat to keep economy from overheating

Janet Yellen ruffles markets with comment on rates

Stock extend losses

Janet Yellen just said interest rates may need to rise to prevent the economy overheating amid stimulus | Financial Post

Janet Yellen just said interest rates may need to rise to prevent the economy overheating amid stimulus | Financial Post

Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen on Tuesday said that interest rates may need to increase to keep the recovering economy from going into overdrive on the heels of significant government spending.Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen on Tuesday said that interest rates may need to increase to keep the recovering economy from going into overdrive on the heels of significant government spending.

Yellen says interest rates may need to increase | TheHill

Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen on Tuesday said that interest rates may need to increase to keep the recovering economy from going into overdrive on the heels of significant government spending.Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen on Tuesday said that interest rates may need to increase to keep the recovering economy from going into overdrive on the heels of significant government spending.

Yellen says interest rates may need to increase | TheHill

WASHINGTON — President Joe Biden’s massive proposed spending on infrastructure, families and education will not fuel inflation because the plans would be phased in gradually over 10 years, Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen said Sunday. New economic reports have portrayed a surging recovery from the recession unleashed by the coronavirus pandemic. Americans’ incomes soared in March by the most on record, boosted by $1,400 federal stimulus checks, and the economy expanded at a vigorous annual rate of 6.4% in the first three months of the year, leading to concern over inflationary pressures. Some economists, notably former Treasury Secretary Larry Summers, have warned that the Federal Reserve’s current ultra-low interest rates, along with the Biden administration’s proposed $4 trillion in new spending, atop about $5 trillion already approved by Congress, risk accelerating inflation. Biden laid out his expansive plans in an address to Congress last week. They would expand the social safety net for children, increase taxes on the wealthy and fund projects that take an ambitious definition of infrastructure, with an eye to stabilizing the economy over the long term with middle-class jobs. Addressing fears about inflation, Yellen said on NBC's “Meet the Press” that the proposed spending “comes into effect once the economy is back on track.” “It’s spread out quite evenly over eight to 10 years. So the boost to demand is moderate,” she said. “I don’t believe that inflation will be an issue, but if it becomes an issue, we have tools to address it.” Yellen, a former Fed chair, said the central bank “has the tools to redress inflation should it arise." Fed Chairman Jay Powell has clearly indicated that he does not believe a sharp surge in prices is likely. Powell is betting that the Fed can keep interest rates low even as the economic recovery intensifies, and will not have to quickly raise rates to stop runaway inflation. Yellen called the Biden plans “historic investments that we need to make our economy productive and fair.” She noted that the administration is proposing that the spending be paid for by raising the tax rate on corporations above the current level of 21% and closing loopholes to encourage U.S. corporations to shift their income abroad to tax havens. People earning more than a million dollars annually would see a tax increase on their capital gains and dividends to 39.6%, the same rate as income for families making over $400,000 a year before the 2017 Trump tax law. The administration is pledging that under its plan, no family earning less than $400,000 would pay a penny more in taxes. Like the spending plans, the tax changes must be enacted by Congress, and the White House’s negotiations with Republican lawmakers, and some Democrats, who staunchly oppose tax increases promise to be strenuous. “Anybody that says this is going to be just on the 1 per cent or big corporations -- I mean, that’s just phoney math,” Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., said on ABC's “This Week.” Marcy Gordon, The Associated PressWASHINGTON — President Joe Biden’s massive proposed spending on infrastructure, families and education will not fuel inflation because the plans would be phased in gradually over 10 years, Treasury Secretary Janet Yellen said Sunday. New economic reports have portrayed a surging recovery from the recession unleashed by the coronavirus pandemic. Americans’ incomes soared in March by the most on record, boosted by $1,400 federal stimulus checks, and the economy expanded at a vigorous annual rate of 6.4% in the first three months of the year, leading to concern over inflationary pressures. Some economists, notably former Treasury Secretary Larry Summers, have warned that the Federal Reserve’s current ultra-low interest rates, along with the Biden administration’s proposed $4 trillion in new spending, atop about $5 trillion already approved by Congress, risk accelerating inflation. Biden laid out his expansive plans in an address to Congress last week. They would expand the social safety net for children, increase taxes on the wealthy and fund projects that take an ambitious definition of infrastructure, with an eye to stabilizing the economy over the long term with middle-class jobs. Addressing fears about inflation, Yellen said on NBC's “Meet the Press” that the proposed spending “comes into effect once the economy is back on track.” “It’s spread out quite evenly over eight to 10 years. So the boost to demand is moderate,” she said. “I don’t believe that inflation will be an issue, but if it becomes an issue, we have tools to address it.” Yellen, a former Fed chair, said the central bank “has the tools to redress inflation should it arise." Fed Chairman Jay Powell has clearly indicated that he does not believe a sharp surge in prices is likely. Powell is betting that the Fed can keep interest rates low even as the economic recovery intensifies, and will not have to quickly raise rates to stop runaway inflation. Yellen called the Biden plans “historic investments that we need to make our economy productive and fair.” She noted that the administration is proposing that the spending be paid for by raising the tax rate on corporations above the current level of 21% and closing loopholes to encourage U.S. corporations to shift their income abroad to tax havens. People earning more than a million dollars annually would see a tax increase on their capital gains and dividends to 39.6%, the same rate as income for families making over $400,000 a year before the 2017 Trump tax law. The administration is pledging that under its plan, no family earning less than $400,000 would pay a penny more in taxes. Like the spending plans, the tax changes must be enacted by Congress, and the White House’s negotiations with Republican lawmakers, and some Democrats, who staunchly oppose tax increases promise to be strenuous. “Anybody that says this is going to be just on the 1 per cent or big corporations -- I mean, that’s just phoney math,” Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., said on ABC's “This Week.” Marcy Gordon, The Associated Press

Yellen: Biden's phased-in spending plan won't fuel inflation