Cancer Risk From Sugary Drinks?  Medscape

Consumption of sugary drinks, including fruit juice, was positively associated with the overall risk for cancer and the risk for breast cancer in a large prospective ...

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A positive association between increased consumption of sugary drinks, including fruit juice, and overall cancer risk is reported from a large French study.A positive association between increased consumption of sugary drinks, including fruit juice, and overall cancer risk is reported from a large French study.

Cancer Risk From Sugary Drinks?

The researchers theorized sugar and pesticides on fruit might be some of the reasons why there are higher instances of cancerThe researchers theorized sugar and pesticides on fruit might be some of the reasons why there are higher instances of cancer

Fruit juice joins the list of cancer-causing foods, new study finds | National Post

The researchers theorized sugar and pesticides on fruit might be some of the reasons why there are higher instances of cancerThe researchers theorized sugar and pesticides on fruit might be some of the reasons why there are higher instances of cancer

Fruit juice joins the list of cancer-causing foods, new study finds | National Post

Consumption of sugary drinks such as soda and fruit juice is linked to a higher risk of developing certain kinds of cancer, researchers reported on Thursday.Consumption of sugary drinks such as soda and fruit juice is linked to a higher risk of developing certain kinds of cancer, researchers reported on Thursday.

Consumption of sugary drinks linked with cancer risk: study | CTV News

Limiting intake of sugar-sweetened drinks may help to cut the number of cancer cases in a population, scientists in France have found.Limiting intake of sugar-sweetened drinks may help to cut the number of cancer cases in a population, scientists in France have found.

Cancer risk is higher if you pound sugary drinks, but the causal link is fuzzy: study - National | Globalnews.ca

“Consuming excessive amounts of sugary drinks, including juices, may raise risk of cancer, according to this 9-year study of over 100,000 people. That's the sort of clear evidence Boris Johnson asked for - debunking his gibberish plan to axe the sugar tax. https://t.co/KrJsGQO74n”

Tom Watson on Twitter: "Consuming excessive amounts of sugary drinks, including juices, may raise risk of cancer, according to this 9-year study of over 100,000 people. That's the sort of clear evidence Boris Johnson asked for - debunking his gibberish plan to axe the sugar tax. https://t.co/KrJsGQO74n"

“#Sugar = #cancer? The latest research says an extra 100ml of sugary drinks a day - about two cans a week - would increase the risk of cancer by 18%. To what extent do you chose foods/drinks based on health? Get in touch #BBCTheBriefing https://t.co/ksyQU0jdwW”

Sally Bundock on Twitter: "#Sugar = #cancer? The latest research says an extra 100ml of sugary drinks a day - about two cans a week - would increase the risk of cancer by 18%. To what extent do you chose foods/drinks based on health? Get in touch #BBCTheBriefing https://t.co/ksyQU0jdwW"

“CC @drharshvardhan Study links a small glass of juice or soda a day to increased risk of cancer - CNN https://t.co/rfMFxFwfoW @Moveribfan”

ASHWANI MAHAJAN on Twitter: "CC @drharshvardhan Study links a small glass of juice or soda a day to increased risk of cancer - CNN https://t.co/rfMFxFwfoW @Moveribfan"

“One cup of soft drink a day linked to 18 per cent increased cancer risk: study https://t.co/eVWyfeARuF via @smh”

David Gillespie on Twitter: "One cup of soft drink a day linked to 18 per cent increased cancer risk: study https://t.co/eVWyfeARuF via @smh"

A study suggests a link for both fizzy pop and fruit juices, although the reason is not clear.A study suggests a link for both fizzy pop and fruit juices, although the reason is not clear.

Are sugary drinks causing cancer? - BBC News

Objective To assess the associations between the consumption of sugary drinks (such as sugar sweetened beverages and 100% fruit juices), artificially sweetened beverages, and the risk of cancer. Design Population based prospective cohort study. Setting and participants Overall, 101 257 participants aged 18 and over (mean age 42.2, SD 14.4; median follow-up time 5.1 years) from the French NutriNet-Santé cohort (2009-2017) were included. Consumptions of sugary drinks and artificially sweetened beverages were assessed by using repeated 24 hour dietary records, which were designed to register participants’ usual consumption for 3300 different food and beverage items. Main outcome measures Prospective associations between beverage consumption and the risk of overall, breast, prostate, and colorectal cancer were assessed by multi-adjusted Fine and Gray hazard models, accounting for competing risks. Subdistribution hazard ratios were computed. Results The consumption of sugary drinks was significantly associated with the risk of overall cancer (n=2193 cases, subdistribution hazard ratio for a 100mL/d increase 1.18, 95% confidence interval 1.10 to 1.27, P<0.0001) and breast cancer (693, 1.22, 1.07 to 1.39, P=0.004). The consumption of artificially sweetened beverages was not associated with the risk of cancer. In specific subanalyses, the consumption of 100% fruit juice was significantly associated with the risk of overall cancer (2193, 1.12, 1.03 to 1.23, P=0.007). Conclusions In this large prospective study, the consumption of sugary drinks was positively associated with the risk of overall cancer and breast cancer. 100% fruit juices were also positively associated with the risk of overall cancer. These results need replication in other large scale prospective studies. They suggest that sugary drinks, which are widely consumed in Western countries, might represent a modifiable risk factor for cancer prevention. Study registration ClinicalTrials.gov [NCT03335644][1]. [1]: /lookup/external-ref?link_type=CLINTRIALGOV&access_num=NCT03335644&atom=%2Fbmj%2F366%2Fbmj.l2408.atom

Sugary drink consumption and risk of cancer: results from NutriNet-Santé prospective cohort | The BMJ

The research also looked at the link between diet soft drinks and cancerThe research also looked at the link between diet soft drinks and cancer

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The consumption of sugary drinks has increased worldwide during the last few decades and is convincingly associated with the risk of obesity.The consumption of sugary drinks has increased worldwide during the last few decades and is convincingly associated with the risk of obesity.

By Kate Kelland LONDON, July 10 (Reuters) – People who drink a lot of sugary drinks have a higher risk of developing cancer, although the evidence cannot establish a direct causal link, researchers said on Thursday. The findings of a large study in France do suggest, however, that limiting intake...

Study finds possible link between sugary drinks and cancer - Cyprus Mail

Study finds possible link between sugary drinks and cancer - Cyprus Mail

A daily small glass of orange juice could increase the risk of cancer, research has suggested.A study of 100,000 people showed that consuming as little as 10 grA daily small glass of orange juice could increase the risk of cancer, research has suggested. A study of 100,000 people showed that consuming as little as 10 grams of sugar a day in drinks — the...

One small glass of juice a day linked to cancer risk | News | The Times

Drinking an average of just under 200 ml of a sugar-sweetened drink or fruit juice each day has been linked to an 18 per cent increase in cancer riskDrinking an average of just under 200 ml of a sugar-sweetened drink or fruit juice each day has been linked to an 18 per cent increase in cancer risk

Drinking sugary drinks linked to an increased risk for all cancers | New Scientist

Though there is no causal link, consuming sugar-based drinks like soda and fruit juice could lead to a higher chance of developing cancer, a new study suggests. Experts suggest a tax hike would help.Though there is no causal link, consuming sugar-based drinks like soda and fruit juice could lead to a higher chance of developing cancer, a new study suggests. Experts suggest a tax hike would help.

Sugary drink consumption increases cancer risk, research suggests | News | DW | 11.07.2019

The findings, from a major study in France, come a week after Boris Johnson said he may reverse the sugar tax on drinks. Doctors said it should serve as a warning to the Government to take actionThe findings, from a major study in France, come a week after Boris Johnson said he may reverse the sugar tax on drinks. Doctors said it should serve as a warning to the Government to take action

Daily drink of fruit juice can increase the risk of cancer by 12%, major study suggests | Daily Mail Online

French research shows 100 per cent fruit juices have the same association with cancer as soft drinks.French research shows 100 per cent fruit juices have the same association with cancer as soft drinks.

Fruit juice linked to increased cancer risk, new study finds | 1 NEWS NOW | TVNZ